Ropes on Boats, McClellanville SC

One thing about wintering near the ocean: it affords me many opportunities to see many kinds of boats and to note their differences and similarities.

Tan and beige ropes tied off on boat railing
Flat-bottomed boat used as 49-passenger ferry and for nature tours in Cape Romain NWR estuary
Blue and tan ropes on tied off on large black stanchion
Shrimping boat at McClellanville commercial dock
Blue nylon rope around cleat on pier
Speedboat at marina in St. Augustine FL

The conclusion seems clear: Boats have ropes.

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9 Comments

  1. Jim Taylor

    I’m a traditionalist about knots — possibly the result of having learned more knots, more accurately, than anyone else in my Scout Troop way back when. So I have contempt for the owner of the speedboat who seems to have thrown his ropes together.
    Jim T

  2. Alison

    Agree, Jim. My dad taught me knots, and it’s been a useful skill over the years. One skill my husband does NOT have. And Isabel, I’m surprised you haven’t made rope?? I’m sure we made rope at Upper Canada Village? and Louisburg? and probably Fort Edmonton? seems a popular activity at many historic villages. I’ll teach you next time we’re together!

  3. Laurna Tallman

    I learned ropes and have wondered ever since why that was part of the Scouting tradition. I have used perhaps three of them fairly often and would have to study to recall the others. Knitting stitches would have been more useful!

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