Very Inntsertieg

The great thing about the internet – and about blogging specifically – is the connections it offers with people you wouldn’t otherwise meet.  The conversations you wouldn’t otherwise have.

Blog Spammer: Fine with your permission allow me to grab your RSS feed to keep up to date with forthcoming post. Thanks a million and please carry on the rewarding work.

Dear Blog Spammer: You have my permission to subscribe via RSS feed, but please don’t grab it. I might need it for a forthcoming rewarding post.  

Blog Spammer:  Simply want to say your article is as astonishing. The clarity in your post is just excellent and i could assume you are an expert on this subject.

Dear Blog Spammer: Thanks so much.  I certainly like to think that I’m an expert on this subject.  In any event, I’m always pleased when readers find my articles as astonishing.

Blog Spammer: The exetprise shines through. Thanks for taking the time to answer.

Dear Blog Spammer: I’m always happy to take the time to answer discerning readers who notice my exetprise.

Blog Spammer: We are a gaggle of volunteers and starting a new scheme in our community. Your website provided us with helpful info to work on. You have done an impressive activity and our whole community might be grateful to you.

Dear Blog Spammer: It’s always gratifying to know that my helpful info has, you know, helped (and even impressed!) others.  Please let me know when you know whether your whole community/gaggle is grateful to me or not.

Blog Spammer:  I apctipeare you taking to time to contribute That’s very helpful.

Dear Blog Spammer: As noted earlier, I’m always pleased when my contributions turn out to be helpful.  I apctipeare you taking time to let me know.

Blog Spammer: Thanks for corugibttinn. It’s helped me understand the issues.

Dear Blog Spammer: I know a surprising number of folks just like you – very appreciative sorts – that I’d like to put you in touch with.  I feel that’s the least I can corugibtt. Send me your real name and address and I’ll take it from there.

Blog Spammer:  My coder is trying to convince me to move to .net from PHP. I have always disliked the idea because of the expenses. But he’s tryiong none the less. I’ve been using Movable-type on numerous websites for about a year and am nervous about switching to another platform. I have heard very good things about blogengine.net. Is there a way I can transfer all my wordpress content into it? Any help would be really appreciated!

Dear Blog Spammer: Isn’t that just like coders?  Always trying to convince us to move to .net from PHP. How odd that you mention the expense: That was what stopped me initially, too. Let me assure you that there *is* a way you can transfer all your wordpress content to blogengine.net.  I don’t what it is, but I urge you not to be nervous.  I hope that helps!

Blog Spammer: You’ve hit the ball out the park! Inbiedrcle!

Dear Blog Spammer: You’re too kind.  I’m not sure I’d say my post was inbiedrcle, but maybe it was biedrcle.

Blog Spammer: Thanks for the points you have discussed here. Something important I would like to say is that personal computer memory requirements generally rise along with other developments in the know-how. For instance, as soon as new generations of processors are introduced to the market, there is usually an equivalent increase in the size and style preferences of all computer memory and also hard drive room. This is because the program operated simply by these processor chips will inevitably boost in power to make use of the new engineering.

Dear Blog Spammer: Thanks for the points you have discussed here.  I’ve always wondered what the link was between personal computer memory requirements and other developments in the know-how. You explain it very clearly.

Blog Spammer:  What I find so inntsertieg is you could never find this anywhere else.

Dear Blog Spammer:  Well, I guess that’s true.  I certainly hope it is.  There’s only so much inntsertieg stuff a person can handle.

 

Sharing is good . . . Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

10 Comments

  1. AAAARGH! so much ignorance, so much time…

    Years ago I commented on a blog post, at some length, as the blogger was a 19-year-old cutter and even showed us some of her carefully attended wounds: LEFT was cut on her left foot, RIGHT on her right foot. She replied to my comments: “Thank you for your words.”

    Yup, mee and you, Izzabelli, has the BEST weeds.

    1. Isabel Gibson

      Barbara – Yes, it’s usually clear when there’s been a breakdown in communication, generating “Thanks for your input,” and the equivalent. Your story is harder to take than my minor irritation with automated spam comments, generated by who-knows-what defective algorithm to sneak past an inattentive guard at the gate. You were trying to talk to a live human.

  2. Jim Taylor

    I don’t know — even when they spell it right, even when they’re not anonymous, sometimes it doesn’t make any sense anyway. Here’s a quote from Rick Hamada, CEO of Avnet, whatever that is: ““You have to appreciate that the milestones we have set in these swim lanes provide a road map for this flow chart. When we get to toll gates, we’ll assess where you sit in the waterfall . . . ”
    Jim T

  3. Laurna Tallman

    Most of the spam I deal with is full of plugs for Viagra, knock-off handbags, and fancy sneakers interspersed with long lines of question marks. Nothing to elicit the editorial impulse or a sense of humour. You have made one of the thankless tasks of deletion hilarious. Much appreciated!

    1. Isabel Gibson

      Laurna – I get that handbag/sneaker spam, too (as well as stealth spam in Korean, I believe), but you’re right – it doesn’t lead anywhere except to the delete button. I much prefer the stuff that at least tries to mimic an actual human’s comment – but fails miserably.

Comments are closed.