Boats, Reykjavik

I know nothing about boats except to call big ones “ships.”  Exactly how big, I don’t know.

That’s never stopped me from wandering around harbours and taking pictures of boats/ships, any more than it stopped me from taking pictures of airplanes, about which I also know nothing.  

General view of Reykjavik HarbourBut back to boats.  When the water is calm and I can also get reflections into the mix, I am one happy wanderer.  Herewith, some views from Reykjavik’s harbour . . .

Blue and white whale-watching boat and reflection in Reykjavik.Boat and reflection, Reykjavik.Boats with reflectionsBoats with reflectionsWhite and brown fishing boats and reflection.

 

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4 Comments

  1. Jim Taylor

    The Sun Yat Sen garden in Vancouver has somewhere in it a plaque describing the principles of feng shui, which, as I recall it, involves bringing contrasting elements together. It’s the rational behind the yin-yang symbol, and behind most Chinese gardens. It mixes hard rock and soft fern. Vertical reeds and horizontal pond. Rocky Mountains and prairie flat. I suspect that an intuitive understanding of feng shui underlies our fascination with reflections. Because the water has to be VERY flat and horizontal to reflect the image of something which CANNOT be flat and horizontal, or it would not reflect at all.
    Jim T

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