Cliffs of Moher, Ireland

Our visit to the Cliffs of Moher counted as a success on two fronts:

  • We could actually see the cliffs. With Ireland’s frequent coastal fog and rain, this was not a given.
  • We didn’t take or see any casualties.  No one went over the cliff.  No one even went over on an ankle.  Given the number of people who did not observe (in the sense of “comply with”) the warning signs, instead walking right up to the edge of the cliffs, or sitting on them, or leaning over them for a photo, this was not a given either.

So although the sun was in the wrong position altogether, I sucked it up, and was happy with what I got.

5-photo collage of Cliffs of MoherAnd I also enjoyed getting photos of the several warning signs, especially the one that seemed to warn against walking on choppy water (bottom right, below).  I certainly can’t disagree with that presumed intent.

5-photo collage of satey signs at Cliffs of Moher

 

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6 Comments

  1. Jim Taylor

    My mother (Irish, the one from Belfast), took me to see the Cliffs in 1954. At that time, they had no fences, no walkways, no gates, no warning signs. You just went up to the edge and looked over. I went on my hands and knees, realizing that a sudden gust of wind or, conversely, a sudden lull in the wind, could lead to a momentary imbalance and pitch me over an 800-foot drop. My cousin, terrified of heights, weaseled forward flat on his belly, held his camera over the edge at arm’s length, and pushed the button. He had to wait several weeks for the film to be developed, to see what he would have seen if he had seen it.
    Jim T

    1. Isabel Gibson

      Jim – Yes, I’ve heard of this slightly cavalier approach to public safety in Ireland – or the presumption of common sense, if you like. I guess I like at least a warning, and they’ve changed a lot in the intervening 64 years. But I was amazed at how cavalier individuals were with their own safety. I get a bit lightheaded on the second step of a step ladder, so I stayed well back.

    1. Isabel Gibson

      Tom – We think they compare pretty well with the Labrador part of NL, at least. 🙂 And I’ve seen some similar cliffs in the Shetlands, more recently, although not quite as high. But they’re all marvelous.

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